Bookbyte Blog

lilbrother_doctorowUntil recently, a Florida high school had a summer reading program that had everyone in the school, regardless of grade level, reading the same book. However, the school’s administration canned the program over the content of this year’s book, Little Brother by Cory Doctorow.

The reasoning is a bit odd. The school, or at least, the librarians and English teachers responsible for actually reading the book and writing discussion materials for the students, vetted it and found nothing inappropriate about it. The plug was pulled at the last minute by the school’s principal, who’s reasoning seems to be primarily based on online reviews. Those reviews mentioned that the book had a “positive view of questioning authority” and “lauding hacker culture.” The principal also said that he had received parent complaints about profanity, though the author insists the only profanity is one indirect reference.

(Even if the book was foul-mouthed, let’s all just admit that shielding 14- to 18-year-olds from naughty words is a losing battle. Personally, those were my peak cursing years.)

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The following essay was submitted by Janice Spencer as part of our #Write2Win Contest. It was one of our favorite submissions, so she’s won a prize and we’re reposting it here.

Adult students in a computer labWith every challenge we meet in life, education is a key flotation device we can all use to better ourselves. Family can tell us we will do “great” but confidence is not always there when it’s been tucked away in the journey of our life. Opening a book and trying to remember how to study its contents is overpowering and challenges our memory synapse. How we can overcome this stress and developing the skills to write is a ladder we haven’t climbed in many years. We, as non-traditional students, are now the learner and it is a tough hill to climb. Read the rest of this entry »

The following essay was submitted by Randi Medley as part of our #Write2Win Contest. It was one of our favorite submissions, so she’s won a prize and we’re reposting it here.

iStock_000012166310SmallFirst, the college experience is different for everyone. Second, the college experience is what you make it. Many seniors in high school know their major, their dream school, and have a plan for the future. They apply to their dream school early and, pending acceptance, send in their depots and are done before February. I was not this senior.

I applied to colleges with a 2.3 GPA having no clue where I wanted to go to school or what my major would be. I applied to nine colleges under either psychology or undeclared. Luckily I was able to get into all nine of the ones I applied to. But come the end of April, I had one month until graduating high school and still no idea where I wanted to go to school. Frustrated and eager to make a choice; I chose to attend community college until I was able to better sort out my plans. Read the rest of this entry »

The following was written by JT Ripton, a writer who has contributed to Teach.com, Apartments.com, CollegeRecruiter.com, and other sites. He can be reached on Twitter at @JTRipton.

The college years are full of tough assignments, hectic schedules, and challenging social situations. It’s easy to shrink back and become overwhelmed in that environment, but that can lead to regret later. Inspiring TED talks are always a good go-to for anyone who needs a bit of thought-provoking insight. The following eight talks are particularly helpful to college students.

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The following essay was submitted by Lauren Cowperthwaite as part of our #Write2Win Contest. It was one of our favorite submissions, so she’s won a prize and we’re reposting it here.

iStock_000009796827SmallLousy or unfair professors sound like they are only in movies but unfortunately, they are common. These range in variety and can be found at any college, whether community or university. The professor could be unavailable outside of class, have unrealistic expectations, or they may perhaps have a different way of grading.

When one of these come my way, I try to stay on their good side. I also try to follow their syllabus to the T. If their tests are completely challenging, I try to figure a little technique that they do. (Trust me, they all have one.) If you have an issue, try to talk to him/her and let them know your situation. Sometimes professors are not aware that students are having issues and a little talk can go a long way. Usually when a professor is approached, they are more easy-going with students that are willing to apologize if they did do something wrong and those that are actually doing well in the class. (Perfect attendance at least, not necessarily grades.) Read the rest of this entry »

The ratings reasoning for the long-forgotten, embarassingly '90s film 3 Ninjas Knuckle Up. Somehow, there were four movies in this series. It was a simpler time.

The ratings reasoning for the long-forgotten, embarassingly ’90s film 3 Ninjas Knuckle Up. Somehow, there were four movies in this series. It was a simpler time.

I am not a sensitive person. Maybe I saw too many Schwarzeneggerian shoot-‘em-ups. Maybe I played too many video games. Maybe I listened to too much metal and hip-hop. Or maybe it’s just because I liked to read. After all, Beowulf includes a detailed description of an arm getting torn of its socket at the shoulder, Tess of the D’urbervilles deals with a woman ostracized for becoming pregnant after a rape, and Catcher in the Rye includes a scene where the frequently profane underage protagonist hires a prostitute. And that’s just the books I read for school.

I’d like to propose a new acronym for these moments, whether it’s graphic content in literature, sensitive content in history, or full frontal content in art history: NSFWBSFS (not safe for work, but safe for school). Read the rest of this entry »

The following essay was submitted by Kristin Stickel as part of our #Write2Win Contest. It was one of our favorite submissions, so she’s won a prize and we’re reposting it here.

Woman resting at work with the feet over the office tableThe most important lesson I’ve learned as a college freshmen was not learned in the classroom or by reading books. It was simply learned by living and being a college freshmen. When a first-time student moves into their dorm room or apartment, they have expectations for what this new chapter in their life will hold, after all the books and movies make it all look so easy.

The most important thing I learned is not to rush things while in college. With living in a smaller dorm and going to all the campus sponsored activities I expected making friends to be easier than it was, it took me a few weeks to find a close group that I fit into. Before I found my friends and sometimes even after I would feel homesick, I wasn’t that far from home but it was still hard, college wasn’t exactly what I hoped it would be,and I was beginning to doubt my decision to attend a four-year program. Read the rest of this entry »

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